Erosive Structures: On Singing-Acting

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[To elope, you really don’t need more than a leather jacket, an artfully placed bedspread and a good grasp on belcanto technique.  – Joyce DiDonato (Romeo) and Patrizia Ciofi (Giulietta) in Bellini’s “I Capuleti e i Montecchi”, Barcelona 2016.]

For helpful illustration, the Liceu has kindly made the full clip of this number available on YT, just in case.

The most entertaining this about this latest take on the weathered Vincent Boussard staging is the very pragmatic erosion of its stilted treatment of the central romance. Those of us who saw the first Munich run (some of us, repeatedly) likely remember with fond aggravation the core principle of “balance on the sink, but no touching the mezzo!”

The show has been around the block since then, including San Francisco and now Barcelona, and if you check out the clip above, there’s been some erosion of that principle in the meantime (with a look at the Lacroix costumes: “if you’re already wearing the bedspread, why not make use of it?”).

But other than looking good, there’s a deeper point about the logic  of depicting romance on the opera stage here, which is something we’ve discussed quite a bit in recent weeks in relation the Brussels “Mitridate” and how it worked and in part did not work in the set-up and blocking. Because unless you really run a tight, abstract concept and keep it sharp throughout the run(s), e.g. the fact that a production travels and sees new casts tends to lead to the most pragmatic and logical connection between two scenic “dots” (within a given cultural mindset of conventions), and not the one artfully thought up by the original directing team.

Particularly when there is not a large involvement of the original team, or no time/money to have extensive scenic rehearsals, or a concept that is only kind-of abstract, plus when there is a lot of different cast members on short notice, what tends to prevail in absence of clear cues is an universal kind of common sense of “what move would character x logically make next?”

And, sure enough, the answer is less “climb the sink and stand at maximum distance to your supposed love interest” and more “hold on for dear life or at least try to”, which leads to another, related point: if there is a discrepancy in vocal and scenic emoting (unless you clearly insist on it as part of your concept (e.g. Müller’s Bayreuth “Tristan”)), that discrepancy tends to erode over time because of a striving for congruence that is ingrained into our systems, I would argue, on a deeper level – unless we are expressively challenged to not do that, e.g. when moving in (often non-Western) art forms where body movement is more rigorously and consciously stylized than in opera.

So, in a nutshell, I would say that “singing your heart out” will instinctively prompt a physical alignment of sorts (whether it is intense yearning across a distance, or tumbling into a bedspread dress: it is about the level of intensity), and if that is not happening, or a not-happening it is not clearly and purposefully framed/used, it will result in a scene or take feeling “off”.

39 thoughts on “Erosive Structures: On Singing-Acting”

    1. I googled it last week and came up empty, will try again – thank you!

      (it would be a typical feature for our *usual* YT channel, too)

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        1. It was June 1st, lots of buzz on Twitter – since the Boussard is already out on DVD, I don’t know if they’ll issue another one?

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  1. I remember the first year, the direction during the duet was: Giulietta sticking to the corner, Romeo walking away toward the door. T.Erraugh followed it exactly, pretty much *not* looking at E.Nakamura and just headed for the exit. I was like : huh? Then the 2nd year, VK arrived.. and she executed this “walking away” soooooo artfully it was amazing: she walked slowly, stopped.. turned around pausing the show her detailed attentiveness to Giulietta.. then walking in jerky motion toward the door, then turn back walking just a few steps back toward Giulietta, finally settling in a position just far enough but close enough to hear everything Giulietta was singing as well as expressing some emotion in her face. So a viewer (me, on TOP floor galerie a BIIIG distance away) can tell how torn Romeo is, perhaps in a bit anxious to get out of there (enemy’s land), but begging Giulietta to come along.. VK’s movements are verrry subtle, but each with a purpose, a lean toward the door, a shift in weight to the leg toward Giulietta, all suggesting where Romeo’s heart lies… let me try a cap for this precise moment that pretty much showed the huge difference between interpreting a “walk from A to B” in a way that we (I) can make sense of.

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    1. oh that photo is making me feel nostalgic…! (at least we still have JDD rocking the part, while VK has retired it)

      A good point with this VK example, too: you need to have a framework to make some sense of a cue, and if there is no framework given (or if it does not make sense e.g. because you have not been given motivational cues for actions/positions), I think there is a tendency to build one and strive for cohesion in the storytelling.

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  2. I fully support the ending of the JDD clip, except for covering their heads with the bedsheetdressthing.

    But yes, Anik, excellent points here! And Tha Dieu, such a thoughtful example.

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  3. wow, i just saw the clip you linked here for “vieni…”, what a huuuuuuuge contrast to the original setting! I’m happy to see these very seasoned singing actresses working it out on what “makes sense”! I think they were really left to themselves to sort out how to get things to work…

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    1. Yes, if you’ve seen the first run, this is just a riot (also, much more rewarding – there is no discrepancy between vocal and scenic energy here)

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  4. How nice this production comes up here just when I was starting to get to know the Kasarova/Netrebko take! (thanks again, thadieu!). I was at first confused from your comments, because the clip from Liceu shows the end of the scene where there is no walking away in the Munich version either🙂 , but now I get that the „walking“ was happening earlier in the scene and I agree this was done very artfully by VK. The concept of not touching and moving away the moment Romeo understands that she is not coming with him also makes a lot of sense for me, simultaneously showing their relationship drifting apart but also Romeo respecting her decision. Regarding the latter I have a bit of a bad feeling with Di Donato’s Romeo in this scene. While VK’s Romeo not touching Giulietta until the very end underlines his respect for her and them ending on the floor really seemed a mutual decision, I kind of had the feeling that Giulietta was talked into this by JDD’s Romeo. While VK’s Romeo clearly shows his despair, JDD’s shows despair but lots of anger as well, understandably so, but the way he closed her dress had sort of a violent touch for me, demonstrating he could just as well tear it off. Certainly a way to interpret this role, but in total I like VK’s take better.
    P.S. Can you experts on this production maybe enlighten me with regard to the meaning/function of the sink? It doesn’t even has as tap, very strange, but the whole setting looks sort of stylish.

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    1. oh, the sink. I still don’t think I’ve figured that one out!

      (one of the most interesting things about JDD’s Romeos is, to me, that she never does the same Romeo twice – she often has, as here, a focus on how young (and, through youth, somewhat brash and selfish) Romeo can be, but if you look at the JDD/Netrebko take, she does a very elegiac and romantic Romeo instead.)

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    2. Agathe, let me casually dropped off one of my (many🙂 ) analyses of this production from the first year so you get the impression on the “no touching” part. The broadcast (even with very annoying zoom-ins in my opinion) makes a lot of sense to you primarily because of very experienced singers, namely V.Kasarova and Netrebko. The first year was truly a head-banging experience for me. But it was a very good experience because after getting so confused i ended up sampling just about every capuleti i could get my hands on and ended up appreciating many other individual takes in their own right.

      It’s true i also get the impression here with JDD that this particular Romeo is rather angry and has some violent tendency and that strange vibe of forcing his way with Giulietta. While i (we) never should find any excuse for such tendency/behavior in general, i was more interested in how she interprets the character here and how (shockingly, for me) different it was from the original insisted staging. Also, as Anik said, and indeed she was quite different in the Zürich’s capuleti, she interpreted the characters differently to try to fit things. (although we have not seen her in the same production multiple nights because sometimes things might come off / on a bit differently, as we have now seen with thanks to 2 consecutive Brussels’ takes.)

      Also a quick note on that staging and singers, now that i have quite a bit more experience after Paris + Brussels:
      I saw 4 singers total: Romeo: Tara Erraught and V.Kasarova, Giulietta: Eri Nakamura and Netrebko. In the first year, VK was sick so T.Erraught (the under-study) replaced her the entire run. In hindsight I have the feeling now that both TE and EN had “their own” visions of how their character should be: EN played Giulietta almost as a victim, she’s always shrinking into the corner, always angling her body “away’ (note the huge contrast with Netrebko’s body angle in the screen cap i posted above). For TE, I think perhaps due to her youth (she was 24 or something!!) , the posture was one of the biggest issues for me, that and the way she walked: *how* to walk to show if you’re in conflict versus “girl, you’re whining and wasting my time, i’m outta here!” impression. It was such a struggle (for the head) to try to make sense of. Judging by this, it seems to me the direction did not focus on how they should channel their combined energy, but probably something like: “you need to be here, and don’t touch her”.

      The tomb scene, you can understand from the broadcast hugely thanks to VK and Netrebko, because in this staging it was one of the most difficult things to grasp and really depends on how the duet played out first. Here Romeo has to do 80% the walking and singing, and the 1st year gave me the impression that Giulietta was some kind of contagious disease occupying the floor and Romeo was running around avoiding getting *any* kind of contact. <– Reading this i think you might get the impression what the stage director might have asked of Romeo: "just go from one corner to another and sing as if you're in pain". Then comes the bit when Giulietta woke up, this was also VERY IMPORTANT because the direction also told Giulietta to NOT look at Romeo, so EN just stood up and ran off to the exit and TE was still in the corner, and you're left thinking: what would I have done if I woke up and know my beloved is in the room? There is simply no sense in 1. not looking, 2. not running over, 3. not touching, 4. heading for the exit by yourself. With Netrebko you see she's coming into contact with VK's hand and a "looking forward to getting out of here together happiness" in facial expression and a much slower "run" toward the exit (but not getting very far, just 2-3 steps, it's the concept that should count, not how many steps you need to take). And here one finally understands: Romeo is now in deep lost realizing it's the end because he has taken the poison and will never be able to join her, that there is no "walking out of here". And then finally the turn around when the two of them are side-by-side against the wall with VK's slowly drifting off the wall non-responsive to Netrebko's touch: symbolizing drifting into unconsciousness: incredible acting + timing. (Because in the previous year, again, finally you see Nakamura now streamlining back from exit to next to TE attempting to hug and TE's Romeo just left the wall at the precise time walking away of the hug-destination (note they were NOT allowed to look at each other in this sequence) and you simply don't get why it was like that.)

      VK had 2 partners: Netrebko (who canceled the 4th+5th performances, probably did not want to injure herself performing the ridiculous sink-climbing-reaching-out-at-unstable-angle maneuver anymore than she had to) and E.Nakamura who took over. In fact Netrebko did much less with that sink (she really avoided it!🙂 ) compared to Nakamura who was reallly effective actually in conveying the desperation of Giulietta risking her life (literally and metaphorically, standing 2 toes on the damn sink, the other foot completely OFF the sink, reaching waaaay up to that statue above) attempting to reach for a higher intervention beyond her existence. I think when done in that sense, you can "feel" Giulietta's unescapable position. As I get to see VK with 2 partners, I also realized Netrebko and EN each had their own interpretation, with Netrebko a very "active" partner to VK in that they both acted and interpreted what the roles are and how to fit together. By the time EN came in, i saw almost identical acting to the year before, and it was really endearing to watch VK always pausing and giving a little space to gauge what EN would do, then just encompassing her and filling out the necessary space and acting to make the things fit (she really improvised this on the fly, very impressive!!).

      In any case, as you can see, i was rather invested in this production🙂. There are a total of 8 posts i did analyzing these 2 runs, around april 2011 and may 2012.

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    3. ps- oh, Agathe, so to answer your question, because Netrebko didn’t do much with it i think one doesn’t see where it fits.. but with Nakamura, I think you can interpret it as a symbol of bare bone desperation (stripping down to the most basic form). A friend of mine also mentioned the sink symbolizing young girls spending time in front of the sink so that’s the most basic thing to have in her room. To me (based on my youth experience of climbing balconies) it’s just a platform to climb out of her desperate situation, especially when done with the scary 2-toes take (i think she has no option except to comply with the direction..).
      (and an excuse for me now to post one of my favorite cap, so much expression in her face.., hope you don’t mind Anik🙂 )

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      1. As if I would ever mind a white shirt on here!

        Thank you for the detailed account, brings back good memories! I reread it 2 times and should go back to my screencap folders… Singers – especially experienced ones – really can make such a different within any given staging.

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  5. Wow, a lot to digest and explore the next days (I’m quite short of time today), thank you! What a treat to be able to get to know this production with so much in-depth thinking to accompany it. And, after having recently again read a “conventional” opera review in a renowned magazine and being so (excuse my language) pissed off with it, I’d really like to point out, how much of a difference it makes if some ‘professional’ critic just sees a production one night and then writes a “smart” review from solely his/her own perspective (but usually never questioning himself being qualified to judge) in contrast to this platform where so much careful thinking and great expertise flows into the blogs (do you write for conventional magazines as well, Anik? if not, you definitely should!). I don’t mean all professional critics are like that of course, but, on average, I see a striking contrast here.
    Btw, I’m going to hear T. Erraught as Susanna, soon (also in Munich), she probably has gained more acting experience by now?

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    1. I saw T.Erraught live as Sesto in Mozart’s clemenza di Tito in Munich, as well as online stream as Oktavian in Der Rosenkavalier and really enjoyed both her musical phrasing as well as her acting! I think this Capuleti was exceptionally difficult to grasp… (at least for me, I don’t think i saw too many people complaining about it during the first year, clearly they didn’t know what they were watching😀 ). I know during the live-stream the second year (here on Anik’s live-blogging event) there were lots of questions regarding the confusing staging, which has much more to do with the camera zooming. In the second year there was quite a few of us VK fans seeing at least 1 show live and pretty much everyone enjoyed the set (when seeing in full rather than zoomed in). But again I don’t think too many people questions the idea of the staging as much as I did, i was rather invested emotionally🙂 (pretty much the same with Mitridate actually, trying to make sense..)

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      1. @Agathe: I can only second what thadieu says, Erraught was a pleasure to watch in the Glyndebourne Rosenkavalier (Liveblog here: https://aniklachev.wordpress.com/2014/06/08/the-glyndebourne-rosenkavalier-liveblogging-thread/) – she really was *very* young for the Capuleti, which was a challenging concept, and she really stepped in at the last minute.

        That Susanna sounds really good – please tell us about it afterwards, I would love to see that!

        As thadieu put it – and I think it is an important point, and I remember Purity stressing the same thing – it can really be the camera angles and zoom in a video that make a concept unintelligible. Even if we just take the recent Brussels “Mitridate”, I really got a better grasp of the intentions (nevermind I still found some sloppily directed) thanks to the wider camera angles and the reaction shots (e.g. Aspasia’s precise shocked disbelief when Mitridate says, without even addressing her, that he is going to kill her along with her)

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        1. Since you were interested in Tara Erraught as Susanna I’ll give you a short report of Figaro at Bayerische Staatsoper which I was so lucky to see this weekend: To make it short, I found Erraught impressive, both singing- and acting-wise. Her voice fits the role very well with soubretta-like lightness where required but she also had chances to show her qualities in the lower range, especially in Deh vieni which was a highlight of the evening. From the role characterization, this Susanna wasn’t always brilliant and superior, outwitting everyone, as I have so often seen her displayed but more human, insecure and prone to helpless, impulsive anger. Erraught did very well in bringing this characterization into the musical interpretation as well, in example in the finale, when Figaro first makes her believe he loves the countess and only then confesses he has recognized her all along, there were audible tears of relief in her voice, but it never seemed put on or overdone.
          Also in this performance there was Anett Fritsch as Cherubino who was staged as very charming, self-confident and good looking, with a considerable portion of vanity, nicely displayed by Fritsch. This Cherubino actually deserved Figaro’s lecture in Non piu andrai. Fritsch has this very smooth, creamy voice and at times added a certain boldness to the musical interpretation for this role which worked really well (at least for me). I hadn’t seen her in a trouser role before and she seemed to feel very comfortable with it. OK, I’ll stop swooning now, let’s just say I’m looking up dates for her Sifare at ROH already….
          Oh and although, in contrast to many in the audience, I was not primarily there for Ildebrando D’Arcagnelo as Figaro, I actually enjoyed his interpretation of Figaro as an immature mama’s boy, very good to see that he doesn’t rely on his ‘latin lover’ looks.
          Ivor Bolton was conducting, mostly choosing very nicely flowing tempi, but I can’t say much more about his conducting since I was so busy focusing on the singers (if I don’t notice anything in particular I think the conducting is usually good).
          It was the last evening of Figaro with this cast and you could feel everyone having lot’s of fun and acting together nicely, a truly memorable evening for me, and too bad there’s no video or broadcast of this performance.

          P.S. got my tickets for THAT Ariodante today after a crazy, hour-long fight with the crashing website and endless telephone waiting queues, yay!

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          1. Thank you for taking the time to write this, Agathe! It transports beautifully and even though I had no chance to hear it, I feel now as if I have heard at least bits of it.

            I can imagine Erraught perfectly as Susanna, especially after you describe her acting take!

            Why my brain decided to mix up the Annette/Anett with the one-syllable surname, I don’t know. Yes, Fritsch makes far more sense! I had to look her up and then remembered her, I heard her in “Carmen” in Leipzig year ago. And then, of course, that Rinaldo.

            Interesting take, between soprano Cherubino and mezzo Susanna. I was always a bit wary of soprano Cherubinos, but the Schäfer takes (the bratty teenage Paris, and the hapless boy-angel one from Salzburg) reformed me. I will never not miss a mezzo sound there, but there are really good soprano versions of it, too.

            Bolton always gives me the impression of getting a good Early Music angel out of conventional orchestras, and classically trained singers. He may not have the drive of Haim or the colors of Minkowski or the elegance of Rousset, but he is consistently good in nearly any given situation.

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          2. Yes, this Fach-switch was an interesting choice. But it worked so well here and in general, this performance reminded me how many possibilities of individual interpretation exist even within a piece that has been so extensively performed, and so nice to see them explored! (e.g. as a funny detail, Cherubino jumped into the orchestra pit, probably that has been done before but I have never seen it). Also T. Erraught may be a special case because her voice doesn’t have much mezzoish sound in the higher range. Certainly no mezzo sound with Fritsch’s Cherubino but her special timbre worked very well, especially in combination with him being displayed as quite a dazzler. We will surely hear more of Fritsch in the future, it seems her career is really taking off at the moment, she has sung the Countess and Elvira in Salzburg and gives her Scala debut next season, also as Elvira.

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          3. Isn’t she scheduled for Salzburg this summer in “Figaro” as well? Let me look it up… yes! As Contessa! (with Prohaska as Susanna, to whom I simply don’t warm up, and Gritskova as Cherubino, who for me is a case of fairly lovely sound, but not doing much with it)

            (PS. I actually once worked a production where Cherubino jumped into the orchestra pit)

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          4. Agreed with regard to Prohaska and Gritskova. Prohaska’s Berlin Susanna was quite a typical case of what I meant by the usual Susanna characterization of ‘so pretty, so smart, always superior to everyone else…’ (although that’s of course also determined by the staging, but I think usually singers have some room to bring something of their own into the characters as seen with MP in Brussels). Gritskova’s Salzburg Cherubino also lacked a bit in sensitivity for me. But still, Fritsch and Pisaroni… a pity Salzburg is so far away.

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          5. and even if it is nearby (I’ll be right next to it), it may be unattainable… and going to a show for just a singer or two, or just the director or the conductor & orchestra is rasonable behavior… right? Or going *despite* participants simply because wanting to see the work live for once.

            yes, super Susannas are not really my style (at least not any longer) – the older I get, the more itneresting I find the flawed ones, and the ones who are perhaps for a second stopped in their tracks by the Count in “Crudel, perchè fin’ora”, and who really need a moment to gather their bearing after “La mia voce?”, and who kind of enjoy upstaging the Countess when it comes to interacting with Cherubino. I would of course have vehemently refuted all these as a teenager (just like the notion that Konstaze at all could ever look at Selim and think “what if…?”), but with each year, I love all the flawed, human bits more.

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          6. We better define such behaviour as reasonable, otherwise I’ll seriously have to worry about how I spent yesterday morning, with hours listening to the waiting music of the ticket hotline while simultaneously refreshing the browser every few minutes, just not to miss that Ariodante…

            With regard to Konstanze, I’ll definitely check out Olga Peretyatko’s performance for that aspect in November!

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          7. Peretyatko even made Gilda kind of bearable (the character is just so not up my alley (though then again, send in the ant colonies and I will likely be forced to reconsider) in the Paris Rigoletto that I just watched because of Kasarova. That is a voice I would always describe as msot at home in Rossini, at least with how it is now. Not necessarily the approach, but just the fit of her sound. (That early scala di seta on The Magic Channel is just gold – even the kids like it). Smiling at the image if you on the phone – I hope the waiting line music wasn’t too bad! Entirely reasonable. (did you already hear Johannsen’s Konstanze in the Jacobs recording? I still have that one on my list, particularly after the Steffani in Berlin. Recently, it seems everyone I am listen to has done or is doing Konstanze: most of the Mitridate line-up has done so, in Papatanasiu, and Petibon, and Ruiten (who is slated again at the Scala with Devieilhe)

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          8. Oh, I’ll check out that scala di seta but am not sure if my kids are up to it yet. Right now we are more at the level of trying different versions of the snake/dragon in The magic flute. The Salzburg 2006 is the current favourite, they also like that Papageno with his funny little Citroen and the human birds flying around. And I actually dragged my 4 year old into Hänsel and Gretel last Christmas (he fell asleep as soon as sandmann arrived).
            Thanks for the tip on Johannsen, will put her Konstanze (and the Steffani!) on my list, too.

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          9. many thanks also Agathe, for the review! i remember watching T.Erraught first in DerR and then live and what i like was how she was making movements/gestures as how a person would in the situation, not “copying” or “pretending” to be a person. And her singing, especially the phrasing, is also all about fitting/making sense of the character.

            On Anett Fritsch, there’s a full Ariodante from Amsterdam online (same house w/ the current live Pique Dame, same staging as Aix w/ PP) with S.Connolly as her Ariodante and S.Prina as Polinesso (from that magic channel.. if you can’t find i can send email, i don’t want to link here..)

            Dehggi is crying a bit re. her(Fritsch) being Aspasia in London, so perhaps she (Dehggi) is also more tuned to what i hear versus what you hear🙂.

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          10. Thank you, yes, I know that Ariodante and have fun listening to it in comparison to PP’s take with an otherwise more or less identical cast. I personally like both Ginevra versions, (and am I a total weirdo to still find that Polinesso strangely attractive?)
            Fritsch is certainly very different from singers like VK or ACA, but for me she also doesn’t fall into the category of ‘undistinguishable bright soprano voices“ you ‘complained’ about with the 1997 Salzburg Mitridate. She’s singing Sifare, not Aspasia at ROH, but I guess you have already found your perfect Sifare?🙂

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          11. oh, my mistake, i was assuming she sings Aspasia because i thought you need that kind of flexible voice (that can sing Ginevra).. who is her Aspasia then? well, i must say i’m a *bit* partial when it comes to this particular pair (but i’m very open minded😉 , and open eared too..)

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          12. Aspasia will be sung by Albina Shagimuratova, I admit I don’t know her. The rest of the cast, also including Spyres, should be very good.
            I don’t know if one can ever be impartial with these things. Maybe I simply like Fritsch by association with this birds scene in Rinaldo which I still can’t watch without grinning stupidly, it’s just so endearing.

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          13. Brenda Rae!
            (and I was quite taken with Varduri Abrahamyan, too)
            That was a fun production (with very charming birds), and so much fun to write about.

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          14. yes, that video has been lurking on corner of my eye since sunday while i was admiring PP in leather jacket + bike helmet… i think i’ll make that music for today, and re-enjoying your screen caps and subtitles!

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          15. I hope they do at least a radio broadcast, I want to compare Spyres’ third take on this in such a short time span.

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          16. That Polinesso *is* attractive (is that even a question?).😉

            Looking forward to Fritsch’s Sifare (I don’t think there will be any streaming beyond audo, though, since it’s a retake and the ROH is notoriously bad about vid streams beond their cinema events?) – although I am fairly certain that, in my case, Greek Soprano Syndrome will persevere. But that shall not keep me from appreciating other approaches (or from curling up in front of the Paris video again at the end of the day).

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    2. also, thank you for the vote of confidence on my opera writing. That means a lot.
      I don’t work as a “conventional” reviewer, and only rarely have done so in the past. At the point where it would have come up as a career choice, I was still working too closely on the production side and couldn’t imagine “switching over to the dark side”!
      The luxury of just writing on opera on my own terms, for the Eye Bags crowd and for myself, is that I do not have to limit myself to a small column or two, and I if I want to link performance experiences to broader topics that interest me, like acting styles or belcanto history, I can simply do so (also, I don’t have to tone down the gay). And I have the space to examine how a performance interacts with myself and my experiences without pretending to be some kind of “objective expert” (which I think doesn’t really exist, anyway – we are always influenced by our personal tastes and our own live experiences).

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