Video Alert: An Aix up our sleeves

 

tanktopthursday_aix trionfo.png

[Looks like Tank Top Tuesday ((c) Dorothy Snarker)! – Sabine Devieilhe in Kristof Warlikowski’s staging of Handel’s “Il trionfo del tempo e del disinganno”, Aix 2016. – Photo Credit: Aix Festival]

Aix is finally upon us!
(Lang, are you still breathing?)

ARTE is transmitting some things, like the “Così” on July 8th, and “Pelléas and Mélisande” on July 7th, but not THE Trionfo tomorrow (July 6th, 10 p.m. (UTC+2)).

Stepping in are Medici.tv, culturebox and Mezzo TV who are all offering a livestream (and we can always hope for our usual channels afterwards), and there will be an audio transmission via France Musique, which should be universally accessible and more than enough.

Warlikowski guarantees an interesting reading, for sure (the set stills look like a dysfunctional family dinner), but I am here even more for Le Concert d’Astrée and Haïm. And for THAT CAST:
Sara Mingardo.
Sabine Devieilhe.
Franco Fagioli.
Michael Spyres.

Please hand me four drool bibs.
(no, make that five because Haïm)

EyeBags will hold a belated liveblog event towards the end of July, if we can get hold of a permanent safety copy (the delay is caused by thadieu, Agathe and myself being away on vacation/research trips. – I will try to program a few summer post for my absence).

 

35 thoughts on “Video Alert: An Aix up our sleeves”

  1. Chuckle, just had a look at the pictures on their website, ‘Auntie Sara’ really fits this styling.
    I’m leaving tomorrow, looking forward to our liveblogging event meanwhile. Have a great time everyone!

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    1. Auntie Sara who shares a wardrobe with Mortician Adams…?

      Wishing you and your loved ones a wonderful vacation, Agathe, and looking forward to new discussions after we all come back!

      >

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    1. Oh, I am so looking forward to this!
      We only need to catch hold of a copy… But with three channels, chances are good (if all else fails, Medici). I tried to check in live last night via culturebox, but was geoblocked. But I shouldn’t cheat anyway, I’ll wait for the others and the liveblogging.😉

      Liked by 1 person

  2. The culturebox take is now edited online and it says “available of 6 months!” (not downloadable, but streamable) – so we’re set for a late July fanfgirling event. Yaaaaaaay!
    (and MERCI to culturebox!)

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    1. Great (and good thing we have recordings stacked up to make it through upcoming Devieilhity drought!) – and of course I only realized now that she was in fact the Serpetta in the 2012 junior production of “finta giardiniera” – now I will have to watch ist again in the upcoming months!

      >

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      1. Finished first round, despite my reservations on the director’s interpretation of this oratorio, I have to say, Haim and the cast won with flying colours.
        Remember you said somewhere “can you imagine Sabine Devieilhe flying into Un pensiero nemico di pace with Haim?” Well I did try to imagine and imagining this itself got me excited. Now, as a matter of fact, she not only fly into, she dive, descend and ascend from it, with a frech and firece da capo. Normally “Un pensiero” gives me excitement, but this one, this one attracted my full attention and stroke me with tension, got me nervous even – no, I am not complaining, I believe in art, a degree of tension (verging uncomfortableness) is good. Would love to discuss with you guys later. I cropped it and put on YT.

        And oh, that male model, get your bloody hand off her chest!

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    1. I am so looking forward to this; thank you, Lang! I have a feeling that Mingardo will be my favorite, as always😉

      Greetings from the mountains via very spotty WiFi!

      >

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    2. omg.. there goes any of my resistence.. just off the ship myself and still feeling the rocking sitting on stationary chair immersing in SM.. now i’ll have to reallly practice patience until the end of the month.. (let me also go hunt for the radio version to see how the sound compares…)

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          1. both! and EH too, there’s this aria at scorching speed, and we know how EH can get her orchestra to build up…
            (in accordance with my compromise.. after radio feed ends i reverted back to Paris Mitridate, very rewarding while waiting ’til the end of the month😉 )

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          2. I’ll be back this weekend – and I think Agathe will be back soon, too. And Lang is around, too, I believe.

            >

            Liked by 1 person

          3. and i’m not back until jul/24 so timing is great! (at least i’m back to having internet this week, hence hunting around a bit anxious, esp. coz SM is waiting😉 )
            have a wonderful week in the mountains!

            Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Lang! i was wading freely through your channel😉
      (and i’d like to lodge a formal complaint of the cut of the duet between SM & MS, which i’ve heard in all versions except this, ohhhh whyyyyy wooooahhhh — meanwhile SM’s aria is now installed in my brain, along with her playful smile while fiddling with the pearls at the beginning.. then that smile at the end…)

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      1. All your comments make me so looking forward to this! I have the old EH version with AH with me on holiday, so I guess I agree with you there. Greetings from the beach with no real internet, I’m back this weekend.

        Liked by 1 person

      2. I certainly would, but AH might complicate the effect — considering the screencaps above, I don’t believe I am giving anything away — of showing the audience figures resembling themselves. Anik, you are the historian; when did stage productions stop using contemporary costume and gestus by default? My guess is later Romantic exoticism and historicism — from which, in asserted reaction, modernity turns the mirror away from nature, back to the witnessed spectacle. Thoughts for your viewing, when I’ll be in the mountains of Massachusetts.

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        1. Perhaps the question is “when did they start using contemporary costume/sets”? or: “When did they start using them consciously?”
          All of early opera, from imagined Arcadia (there were very detailed conventions for nymph costumes) to the imagined Antiquity of High Baroque, the “contemporary” was very present-day with a little jaunty warrior helmet or a breastplate for reference. That works up to Rigoletto – sure, renaissance Mantua, but we all know whom we are talking about.
          Which was fine, until – as you point out – later 19th century identiy politics and ideas of authencity inspired the historicist notion that one could be truly historic (and in that, authentic) and completely exclude one’s own, later perspective.
          My favorite example for this are pirate movies from the 1960s in comparison to the golden era of the 1930s/1940s. The costumes and settings are the same timeframe in the same location, but invariably the hairstyles (60s heroines’ hairstyles are really the most glaring example) etc. state when this point in history was reimagined. Only what Baroque did somewhat consciously, modernity did not.
          Once, I went to see a “Tito” and ran into an esteemed older colleague, who complained about the contemporary suits and demanded togas for authenticity. “Authentic to what?”, I asked him, since in 1791, no one was onstage in a toga. “To the time of the story”, he insisted. As if 1791 hadn’t done just that, from its own perspective.

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          1. Authentic: there speaks education as a propertied class. And there, perhaps, appears a link between the historic/exotic and the democratic. Mozart’s audiences mostly knew what Mitridate did; Bellini’s didn’t have to.
            Thank you! for the example of pirate movies. A marvelous type case. My favorite is what happened to Walter Scott in 1950s Hollywood:
            “Fight, fight, fight! That’s all you know how to do, Dick Plantagenet!”

            Liked by 1 person

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