The Fenice “Juditha Triumphans” (2015) Liveblogging Thread

opernglas

Welcome to the White Shirt live comment thread for Vivaldi’s “Juditha Triumphans” from la Fenice in 2015, starring Manuela Custer (Juditha), Teresa Iervolino (Holofernes), Paola Gardina (Vagaus), Giulia Semenzato (Abra) and Francesca Ascioti (Ozias).

Alessandro de Marchi conducts the orchestra and chorus of La Fenice, the staging is by Elena Barbalich. Special mention for the costumes, since they will no doubt also be covered by some discussion, by Tommaso Lagattolla.

The original (Italian) program book (containing a libretto in Latin and Italian some interesting essays on the employ of voices and the development of the costumes) for the production can her found here at La Fenice (pdf), a html-based libretto in Latin and Italian here, a bilingual edition in Latin/English (from the Pinchgut production) is available here.

382 thoughts on “The Fenice “Juditha Triumphans” (2015) Liveblogging Thread”

  1. having fun so far with onslaught on baroque instruments to ears. but they’re using the modern bow? (note same conductor as the one for MP’s Iphigénie in TADW, not sure about orchestra)

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      1. yes, an I like the drive they’re having. And they sure weren’t kidding with the warfare instrumentation – brass and timpani
        (since it is the Fenice house orchestra, they would use modern instruments – though they probably hired the theorbo just for the occasion?)

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      1. add the sleeveless violin in the glasses.😉

        ohhh, the obe can come, too. The sound comes across *great*

        (also, if anyone had doubts about this being Vivaldi – after that violin concerto to get started, everyone should be up to speed…)

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          1. I should have learned by now not to click your links just as I sign off for bed… Now I either need a cold drink or a gym workout.

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          2. indeed i was quite drawn to both the haircut and the suit.. and now just got my hands on a full version of it, music for the night, i can’t tell you how well these two go together (hair + suit)!!. and a quick read, a mezzo who loves to play young men! let’s face it, that’s how i knew her in the first place.. i think i even saw her in that other Romeo in Fenice as well.. but it didn’t leave as such a strong impression as her xpants + musical phrasing.. (and now very distracted by haircut+suit..)

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          3. Thank you for the interview link! (There is a Capuleti with her floating around the web? must investigate…)

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          4. yes, that’s where i first discovered her, waaay back, though Dehggi had a better memory of her name.. coz I only recognized the name in this Juditha but didn’t make the connection..
            And i got it wrong, she was not in the Fenice Capuleti last year, i watched it but didn’t make a strong connection to Romeo there (Gianasi, sp?)

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          5. …Giannattasio? Would be another “soprano” Romeo…

            It feels like every Italian Singer under the sun has gone through that Ravenna staging, or is it the Italian stagings of this all look the same?

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          6. yes, the WS experience can only be gathered with age.. i can’t tell you how much pleasure i have watching this.. in full speed, all 50sec of it.. i hope it doesn’t freeze on your workstation.. promise to be the last link i post today: the hair, pantsuit, and Paola Gardina jazzing.

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          7. Am still on out-of-office appointments – must resist until I get back to the Mac! Darn, the temptation…!

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          8. you will enjoy it (i hope!) if have trouble, you can download on the mac, the point to it in the Finder and hit “space” and it’ll play by itself.. currently round and round on my screen..

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          9. …oh my.
            also, I just figured out that the Mac, without prompting, will play this on infinite loop. (good, because I am not sure I can move right now).

            But on a more serious note, also re: that interview: Singers enjoying building roles regardless of gender, and being relaxed about that fact, is an aspect that will make me be more interested in their work overall, and make more of an effort to follow their careers. Not because I am thinking “Oh, queer stuff”, not even “oh, an ally!” (at least not in the first place) – because it is not about that, and that is precisely the issue I have with singers vocally distancing themselves from trouser roles, citing age, or difficulty of connection (you play scheming murderers or sociopaths or abusers or airheads, and that’s something you won’t comment on, but you have issues with playing a young chap in love? Give me a break) or costumes or overall discomfort.
            It’s one thing if people like von Otter say “I am growing out of the motivations of the very *young* men” (also because it is von Otter and von Otter is smart and a decent human being and I would always give her the benefit of the doubt), but the usual pattern is not that. Instead, it’s “ah, no, guys, sigh, such a drag” (only without the pun), followed by “*high giggles* look how pretty I look in this dress!”
            And my reaction to that usually is a) “oh, someone has views on gender that are rather unreflected.” or b) “oh, someone is struggling with gender/bordering on transphobia when – other than for marketing reasons, which is another issue – taking on a cross-gender role (which is your job, just as it can be your job as a singer to play a fox or a fish in a pan) prompts them to repeatedly frame their offstage gender identity and call attention to it”. In both cases, I will be less interested in a singer’s work overall and assume it to be less artistically honest, trailblazing and thought-through.

            If someone who sings trouser roles complains about trouser roles or expresses discomfort (and that reason is NEVER ‘I have to play someone who is having male privilege and disrespects women, and that is hard for me to get into as a woman’ – I never read/heard THAT anywhere), my first thought is: “But why would you feel the need to distance yourself? Do you think your singing cross-gender onstage would influence, or have me make assumptions about, your offstage gender identity? Which, btw, is none of my f***ing business to begin with? How do these two things even relate? Why do you link a professional fact to a private stance?”
            And then my grumpy, sarcastic second thought tends to be, “oh, right, and it would be SO horrible to be thought of as genderqueer/anything other but heteronormative for a moment, so *of course* anyone should hurry to distance themselves from that, and, no, that is not queerphobic or transphobic in a wider social context AT ALL.”

            And, yes, I am aware that interviews are a tough brand to begin with – it’s a marketing tool for a largely heteronormative-governed market, plus what you say and what someone will actually write up are two different things -, but I admit that I do take notice if I find someone repeatedly making distancing remarks even when not prompted for them, just as I take note of someone not hurrying to scream “Heteronormative!” from the magazine rooftops at any given chance.

            (Hm. I’ve been meaning to write down some of these things for quite a while. I think think I will turn this into a post eventually.)

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          10. yes, i read it as exploration (her interview) and that she has no problem because as a performer that’s part of what she does, the same way i enjoyed her Dorabella (though, i’ll make more comment about the gif below..) or Vagaus (which originally i didn’t know was a trouser role). So far i have seen only 2 singers talking often about relief of playing non-trouser roles.. but perhaps because i only follow singers who don’t have these insecurities..
            On a side note, S.Mingardo did mention that it takes a certain amount of energy to play young men and that she used to be able to sing Cesare earlier but now can not manage, and i take it as her being honest about fitness and not bringing attention; she had no trouble singing Ottone now and seems never “shying” away from portraying a true character both in music and in acting. Also VK is another one who mentioned vocal fitness, again, that’s different, as we always know her as a deep-thought person who is very dedicated to the art. In the end, i think only insecured people feeling the need to broadcast how “straight” they are while worrying their straight fans are not flocking away..

            In any case, P.Gardina is making a fan out of me.. am currently going through her Capuleti, here’s the entire performance, just for ref in case you’re interested.

            And a short note, back to the dancing: i’m very impressed with her posture!! and the experience leading! check out the fantastic balance and accommodation for her follower during the first spin move. In contrast you can tell Fritsch is not used to leading as she did not make room for Gardina to spin under. And the light touch on the shoulder… (ok, i back to work..)

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          11. Thank you for the playlist! Off I go in hunt of the duet.
            Sidenote: What is it with the Romeo Hair in this production? Polverelli was alrealy staged like an early Raphael gone haywire, and if I look at this, well, aporpos Haywire!

            On trouser roles: I was only referring to rejection due to to cross-gender aspects above, in case I was not clear enough. Saying “I don’t feel up to this any longer due to fitness” is another thing. And to a certain degree, I even get the life experience thing – like von Otter saying “Their motivations are farther away from me now” (or mezzos retiring a bubbly Rosina because they feel they cannot do her justice any longer), although that always makes me think of Berganza’s Cherubino at nearly 60, and how we should not equate singer’s and roles’ age – how many 50+ or even 60+ Isoldes say they don’t feel up to singing a supposedly 17-year-old princess anymore?! How many weight-challenged aging tenors retire the roles of young military men due to fitness concerns?! …What does this say about our current concept of “acting” (and of gender!)? – There is also a background aspect on women’s age here that I do not approve of (on a cultural level, it is not about individual singers)

            During my active years (late 90s/early 2000s), I have had quite a few encounters with the “but I only do this because I have to and did I mention this morning already how happy I am to be a GIRL!” crowd – less in Early Music rep, though. I guess because it is so common there and because it comes from a different mindset of ’embodying’ a role.

            Now I must look at the dancing again for technical aspects – you make me miss my active years there!

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          12. you do know singing much more than i do. but i was thinking along the line of an athlete, which is what some of the singers refer to. In this case there is a truth to losing the athletic level and not being able to compete at a high level (only in term of sprinting for now, for example). Do you think the staging can play a part as well? If it’s significantly less sprinting/wrestling around on stage, less focus on “the look” and much more focus on vocal expression, as a smart, mindful and good singer/actress you can always bring out other facets of the characters regardless of age. But to satisfy some of the stagings today would this statement still be true?

            This capuleti was in 2001! she was practically just out of school or something.. check out the dragon fire effect on Part7 (where her voice pierces quite well above the orchestra). SHe has this “ping” that’s a bit hard on my listening (my problem in general), but i think you also hear here how high the part is? Ja, i have no idea about the hair.. and we made plenty of comments about the outfit..

            (ps- i can not get enough of the dancing.. already the starting.. damn.. that pantsuit was really amazing in creating the lines.. i was always drawn to the pants in dancing!)

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          13. The lines – yes, overall good balance/coordination (which is always more visible in flowing pants). I wonder if she has some background in dancing or martial arts?

            To your question – singing IS athletics. It is a huge physical effort, and just like an athlete, you depend on the flexibility/humidity/tension/control of certain muscles and joints and tissues, and that does wane with age. Experience can compensate for a lot (in that, it is more forgiving that the Olympics where so few disciplines give experience an edge), but of course you have to deal with shifting limits. And park-and-bark stagings of course help to a certain degree – or simply stagings that focus on aspects other than wrestling.
            But I think there is some trouser role sexism coming in again at that point because there is very much a standard on how female singers should be able to look and move in a male part (a lot of it ties back to youth, and that is a set of expectations very much gendered).

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          14. Oh, you are back at Capuleti, I’m looking forward to check out Gardina’s performance, but only in a few days, after recovering from the immediate impression of Genaux’s Romeo🙂
            You kind of asked for it, so here’s my review on yesterday’s Capuleti at Musikfest Bremen:
            It was the first time for me to hear Vivica Genaux life and you probably know her voice much better then I do. My first impression was that of a very special sound with this extreme frontal positioning which took me a bit to get used to, but was very effective in the lower range and is, I think, also part of her way of expression and text delivery. Especially in the first part, the purist in me had some issues with her strong vibrano (is that what you meant with discussions about her jaw, a while ago, thadieu?). However she absolutely excelled in dramatic expression. I liked her even more in the second part, where of course she had lots of opportunities for fierce anger and desperation but also had heartbraking piano passages. In line with that, her acting was also fantastic, I’ll write more about that below.
            Her partner as Gulietta was Valentina Farcas, whom I didn’t know before but after this performance am quite sure to hear about more often. What can I say, she was a perfect Gulietta, she has a sensible and flexiblel voice (she also sings parts like Despina and Cleoptra), yet didn’t have any problems to fill the house, with beautiful lyric colouring and wonderfully transporting emotional depth. (bonus: haircut).
            Despite their differences, the voices of Genaux and Farcas also mixed very well in the duet and unisono parts.
            The men: solid, but not so interesting in comparison.
            The band, Europa Galante, under Fabio Biondi is a rather young group (except for Biondi himself), who were carrying the piece along with lots of drive and enthusiasm. There were quite a few little wavers in intonation or sound production in the brass, which did surprise me, given their status, but then, the acoustics were also quite dry. Biondi’s conducting on stage with his smooth, yet engaging attitude was fun to watch! Regarding instrument choice I loved the early fortepiano, such a cool sound.
            Most impressive about this evening, besides the musical interpretation, was the extremely engaging acting by both leads, which at times made me completely forget this was supposed to be a concertant performance.  There was even enough white-shirtish action to cause uneasy shuffling in the audience (btw. compared to the average age of this audience, I don’t think we have to worry about becoming opera Cougars any time soon). However, no shuffling and coughing any more as the story progressed. Genaux’s performance in particular was so gripping, I still feel a bit dazed today. This was all the more impressive since there was no staging, no director involved, so everything must have been worked out by the singers themselves. Of course, this piece makes it rather easy to follow in acting what the text and music say, still you could tell, that the singers had an own interpretation of their character in mind. In example, there was clear character development in Gulietta in the final scene of Act I, where Romeo gets caught in the Capuleti’s grounds. The moment, Romeo’s men arrived for help, there was such a relieved smile in Gulietta and she then very firmly positioned herself at Romeo’s side, as if only in that precise moment, in the wake of overwhelming relief, her decision had become clear to herself. Biondi has done Capuleti with these same leads before (there’s even a life CD recording) so that has certainly also helped a lot for the singers to develop their interactions in acting. Also, it might have helped that this performance took place in a theater as opposed to a concert hall, so singers were performing in the front of the the stage, with the orchestra in the background.       
            So, a very impressive evening and also one that strongly reminded me on recent discussions here on singers who cross certain borders, sometimes even sacrificing beauty of sound in favour of expression.

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          15. And I was just wondering whether you’re still somewhere passed out on a cloud of bliss…!

            Thank you so much for taking the time to do this write-up.
            Yes, the front projection of Genaux takes some getting used to, and it does influence her vocal color, but it also – as you point out – works well in regards of ange and agility. As a tick, it would put me off, but as a technical choice, I appreciate it. I’m seriosuly consifering getting that recording, I am curious about the orchestra sound. Although after your review, I want a video!🙂

            Oh, and now I googled the “haircut” – yes, I do see your point. Mhmmmmmm.

            PS. The announcment I read also made a point of the historically informed recording – it would make for an interesting comparison with Bartoli’s Norma, who aimed at the same thing.

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          16. and a glimpse of the pantsuit and haircut? Actually i dont think i’ve never heard Capuleti with a baroque band before.. think i’ll search for it on spotify tomorrow and hear again how different she sounded compared to 2008..

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          17. Hey, thanks, I guess that’s the pantsuit she wore, Guglietta’s hair is lighter now, but the same cute cut.
            Yes, the baroque band did make quite a difference in sound, also the tempi were mostly quicker than I had heard them before. Both of you, check your Emails!🙂

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          18. thank you Agathe! just got the goodies.. will check out when i woke up.. but i’m still so happy to read your report.. as i might have told you before VG got me into opera in august 2008 (she had a killer cute hair back in her “voice from the cold” portrait).. and i still have very fond memory of meeting her (and Fabio Biondi) in Los Angeles in Jan/2012. She was incredibly friendly with a very generous smile , and i sat 2nd row listening to her Vivaldi, was really a unique experience to experience such an artist that close.. and whatever the strange issues people were busy discussing on tube about her jaw.. i have no clue anymore.. but yes, you were right about her “vibrato” which i hear much stronger in the past when she was singing high notes.. i don’t know how she sounds recently.. which brings me to the goodies🙂, will report. But yes, was very happy to read your description on her artistry level.

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          19. just found it, guess what is running – thank you!!!!🙂
            tempi, and the instrumental colors are so different – the fortepiano, but also the harp (almost a guitar-like quality!), the horn for the Giulietta cavatina!

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          20. Yees, that horn is beautiful, actually all brass is working very well, I also love the harp, quite cool. I have not completely figured out, if all (or which) instruments are historical versions. It’s all very intense, I had to give up to listen to it this morning while working because I didn’t get anything done.

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          21. I asked myself that same thing – are these all early 19th century builds/rebuilds? Does the harp have different strings? What were 19th century horns compared to 18th century ones?

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          22. Yes! I got up to 1:25:00 today – also the way the put some phrases close to exclamation or have them half-spoken, very ad lib with meter, really adds to the drama.

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          23. eavesdropping.. part 2?? hours?? i’m very much looking forward! have several meetings so won’t get around to this until may be 5 more hours ack! definitely music for my night…

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          24. You talked to VG? Cool! And I’ll have to dig out that portrait…
            Check out the early fortepiano in Biondi’s take (i.e. in the first part duet you hear it quite well).

            I just browsed Biondi’s page a bit, and did you see the Händel at Wiener Konzerthaus in January, oh my, lucky you, Anik!

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          25. Thank you for pointing out the Konzerthaus Concert! I just put the Ticket sale Start date into my calendar.

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          26. i'm supposed to be sleeping but got up from a bad dream, this is a much better read to go back to sleep to..
            many thanks for your impression! I don't know much about positioning techniques etc and was only going by what people complain about on tube regarding her jaw.. but my impression upon hearing her live, especially the 2nd time also with Biondi, was that these world-class singers are so rare and unique in live experience you are simply absorbed and be appreciative of what they do. But i'm also super happy to hear she left such a great impression regarding drama + vocal characterizations. I think similar to ACA she had trouble before with her high notes and mentioned in recent interview she finally found the right technique (or something similar) that allows her now to explore her new high range (if you have a listen to her earlier Romeo, which i have on my channel, you'd hear almost every high notes were moved down 1 octave or something to that effect, and i always love her low notes). I also saw her in a theater setting singing and i think even there you wouldn't be deprived of the dramatic effect, i think some performers are simply driven to not stand still🙂.
            in any case, back to sleep for me, many thanks again for the really nice and detailed account, and more pointers from the singing side too which i have no clue before.

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          27. PS. watching the final scene again – Farcas makes a good Giulietta in acting: spot-on youthful exuberance. (interesting comparison, too, after recently watching the Ciofi/JDD, whose takrs feel more grown-up)

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          28. yes! i felt exactly the same way watching the finale earlier about Giulietta!

            i saw part of this when i first discovered VK.. and you know how hard it is to listen to VK and not getting over the nasty hurdle of not comparing… that’s why it took me such a long time to get back to it (or any other performance) and just listen on its own merit.. in any case, i think her acting is quite minimal here.. and if i read correctly from that interview this might have been one of her very first big role…

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          29. probably, it notes she was taking on roles before finishing her studies (which she did in 2002) – not uncommon though. She reminds me of someone who also got their first break while officially still in school, and I’ve worked with more than one singer who never officially finished their studies because they were offered a contract and never had the time to go back and do exams/write a thesis.

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    1. petition to change the plot.
      (Custer is very focused on singing evenly – from her stage presence, I’d peg her for more of a concert singer?)

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  2. so, on a stage concept idea level , I wonder whether the cleavage/lipstick/shoulders situation on our male military leaders here is a tribute to the original cast of all boarding school girls? Kind of addressing the history of the work?

    (on a personal level, I am simply very thankful)

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  3. she’s supposedly singing this:
    “Wherever I am led by love of the Fatherland
    and the hope of liberty, sweetest of hopes,
    guided by the highest rays of heaven
    may I walk in safety among these soldiers”

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    1. rocking continuo!
      Also, Abra SO has a crush on Juditha. (though, hey, who could blame her for eyeing Vagaus in addition?) (see, bi visibility. This is politically sound evening)

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  4. …why does Holofernes get more cleavage than Juditha? Is this a comment on Babylonian stances on gendered self-expression?

    (not that I am complaining)

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    1. also, what’s it with Vagaus eyeing Juditha? Does he sense the presence of doom, or does he want to invite her back to his tent?

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  5. okay, Juditha clearly did not count on Holofernes being that attractive. (but, girl, that is the wrong direction to fall into – you’ve got a contralto and a mezzo right there!)

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    1. i’d have a hard time figuring out which of the Holofernes team i’d drape myself over! (both! but that xpants are seriously challenging my concentration too)
      (i don’t understand what Juditha is doing at all)

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    1. my fav things about Iervolino so far:
      – the heavier lower range (the lighter middle carries better if she does not have to be too fast)
      – swagger
      – that FROWN-STARE. Silent movie levels on Da-yum!

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      1. yes, it’s not fair that i heard S.Mingardo first.. but i don’t have issue with A.Hallenberg. As Anik said, it’s sitting low, vibrato, and i also don’t get her facial expression either.. just doesn’t express much except smiles that i find strange.

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    1. that aria is slow and low, does not sit comfortably for her – and in the long held notes, the vibrato shows. Not as clean.

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      1. see, that trill on the lower middle range “Lux” e.g. – sounds on the dry side, as if the air is not adjusted dynamically.

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        1. perhaps linked to that striving for “even sound” – it’s sound before text expression? (perhaps the Latin is a bit more difficult there, too, though they make it very Italian)

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  6. It speaks for the performance quality that, from the stills, I always expect the costumes to be disruptive (unconventional form, very wide, very bright colors), but they don’t take away from the action at all.

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    1. sweet-talking in Latin. never thought THAT would work, but here we are.

      (why didn’t they show is THIS during Latin classes in school (other than the fact that Iervolino was likely still in kindergarten)

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    1. really, Custer shows the most remarkable acting skills here: she manages to sit there without drooling and look bored.

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    2. but the orchestra is playing up SHARP!

      (Custer’s upper range remains curiously flat – you see that when she gets to draw out notes, or on the syncope line just now – the sound doesn’t rounden, does not “curl in” organically at the ends. I wonder whether this is a stylistic choice? Juditha is supposed to be rigid, after all.

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      1. This Juditha either had major depression or beginning psychosis, she has no emotional responsiveness at all, rigid, exactly. If that is the plan for the character her acting is actually quite good!

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        1. I have never seen Custer in anything else, so I cannot compare, but I’m curious now about how much of this was the staging.

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    1. see, and in a Puccini opera, you’d be screwed, since there might be no other woman to connect to at all, and here you have four at your fingers. I ❤ Early Music.

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    1. actually, now it looks like Juditha and Abra are actually dating – “just off to kill that stud enemy over dinner, back for nightfall, please wait up”.

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  7. ok, more beef: i’d say for each word she simply sings the word without shaping it, so i hear only individual words pronounced well but not a phrase.. this, and navigation, ack.. you know Juditha was my fav character (thanks to S.Mingardo) that i’m really suffering through this… promise last of this thread. Abra on the other hand just can’t keep her hands of Juditha..

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  8. I’ve got to commend the acting of all five – this long glances/stances/circling while holding the tension but not overdoing is not easy to do. Good cues all around.

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      1. Too bad Juditha is sitting too low for the Ant Colonies! But Yes to Hallenberg (though opposite that Holofernes, it would be a tough call!), and I am looking forward to Ernman’s take.

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          1. and she is grappling a bit with the coloratura, too, in some parts, but her take is much more engaging.

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        1. aria is sitting on the register change for her, though. But an interesting piece. Makes me wonder who the woman sounded for whom Vivaldi wrote this.
          (this one here I’d peg for a mezzo – not a contralto)

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  9. Juditha, honey, the mandoline is fine, but we’ve got to work on your seduction game. Take a page from how Abra looks at you. *sassy nurse headshake*

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    1. I don’t get how Juditha remains standing…

      Oh, nevermind. She has ended up on the table.
      Well, I don’t get why her dress doesn’t fly of, either.

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    1. Hot DAMN.

      (and this is the first interesting Judith bit again, when she is played as being attracted to Holofernes and conflicted about it.)

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  10. what I like about the Holofernes staging here is that he gets an edge of menace – he is physically dominating the scene – but he always steps away again and is not threatening her into anything. Makes it all have much more gray zones, not simple villain/heroine.

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          1. the machinations of patriarchy?
            or are contraltos simply that appealing?
            (I would roll my eyes at a few women with that move, too – but those are the women who buy into precisely that macho power scheme)

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      1. well, if she’s gay and secretly dating Abra, team “shoulder swagger with the low notes” won’t work on her…?

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      1. i hope she transitions well into the low notes! i’ll get Galou i think.. Agathe, you’re also heading to a Juditha somewhere this year? they’re singing everywhere it seems.. each w/ a different Juditha

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        1. I can imagine Galou even better. And even better as Holofernes than as Juditha…
          Still not sure about Ernman, but she has warmth and expressiveness, and good acting chops and a sense of timing. So I am cautiously hopeful.

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  11. and Abra is really over the moon for Juditha – that aria text is sure something right out of a romance novel. if this were 19th century and a tenor involved, no one would bat an eye.

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          1. so now Abra is going back to light those candles again and warm up the dinner in the microwave and slip into something more comfortable?

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  12. while we sit through that monologue of Juditha working herself up to murder, a moment to recall that in Baroque times, the whole “woman-advances-on-man” role reversal, the “limp fallen sword” and pouring blood=bodily fluids was also played as a sex metaphor.

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  13. so what’s the meaning of “I only chop off the mask”? – The production is too abstract to pull a ful-on salome? Or is it about the symbolic defeat of the warlord ‘persona’ of Holofernes? (and privately, they will still shack up?)

    Also, the actual reveal here is that Vagaus has been in love with Holofernes for the past 2 hours. And that is some damn good coloratura by Gardina there.

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          1. I should be able to make most nights, too – how about you, thadieu? Which day is good for you?

            I suggest the Toulon “Cesare” this time that Agathe kindly brought to our attention, and which has Prina and Bacelli AND Iervolino as Cornelia (I hope she gets to frown and scowl a lot).

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          2. yes, let us watch Toulon “Cesare” . Is there any objection regarding Saturday night on your end, both of you? it’s most convenient for me as I don’t lose 1 day of work/meeting on my side..
            i wanted to say this last WS event Juditha was sooooo rewarding, i had an absolute blast!! but also thanks to you both i’m now more familiar with Mozart’s DonG and Così (at least musically, still not that much in depth re. all the issues, but i’ve been eavesdropping on your discussion with FF in the other post). At this rate, perhaps we can solve “Magic Flute” for me as well with a scheduled event as i’m still not sure what that one is about and according to Stray it’s got “a lot of problems”… But prior to that, since Anik might need some investigation of a certain soprano’s range😉, i’d recommend Sonia Prina’s Galatea (though you know, well.. we can negotiate, because i also have S.Mingardo’s Galatea in mind🙂 ).

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          3. Saturday should work for me.🙂

            And let us collect future suggestions, by all means! Aci, and a Magic Flute (we’d need one with good subs, though – there is no perfect version I’d immediately think of), I’d also suggest Figaro at some point (perhaps Petibon’s Aix 2012?)… My conference schedule does not start back up again until mid-Sept!

            >

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          4. Regarding Galatea, let’s just decide on the production featuring the better hairstyling🙂 (although, Prinas strange mermaid styling is maybe also not to everyone’s taste).
            Cesare next, great, Saturday should likely work for me.

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  14. Juditha thinks she should have gone with Plan B.
    (The coloring between the costumes and the lights is really spot-on.)

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  15. ps- note how important the orchestra is! you really need a *very* good orchestra and a conductor who has knowledge of this period.. else you get the smoothy version i got which can be infuriating…

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  16. As always a pleasure to go to the virtual opera with you two 🙂
    ( we really should do white shirt things and Baroque more often, although now I need to wipe down my keyboard…)

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          1. am skimming through 200 Juditha comments now (Holofernes/Vagaus comments, more like it) – must be in there somewhere!

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          2. it is. I’ve seen the Germans much sharper, but the team has rotated a lot in recent years.
            I like Maroscan today, she tends to be a bit of a wild card.

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          3. she amended it to “possibly”😉
            I know neither the one going out, nor the one going in… I would have known Laudehr!

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          4. I guess we’ll see – no idea, Neid has been on the job forever.
            Are you heading out now? I’m off to bed.

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